jeudi 1 septembre 2011

Great Britain / Peru: Two black women, even a revolution.


Baroness Valerie Ann Amos of Brondesbury, chair of the House of Lords.

        
Born March 13, 1954 in British Guiana (act. Guyana), she was nine in 1963, when his parents arrived in Britain. She was educated at Bexley High School for Girls Technicaln (current Twonley Grammar School for Grils) to Bexkeyheath. She continued her studies at the Universities of Warwick, East Anglia and Birmingham.
        
In 1989, she is the head of the Commission for equal opportunities, government agency responsible for fighting against discrimination in the workplace. After five years, is co-founder of consulting firm "Amos Fraser Bernard" including advising the government of Nelson Mandela, elected in April 1994 as head of South Africa post-apartheid, the sector reform public, human rights, fairness in employment ...

        
In 1995, she received a teaching award at the University of Thames Valley. In 2000 she was awarded an honorary doctorate in law from the University of Warwick and the University of Leicester in 2006.
        
In 1997, after serving particular functions of British High Commissioner in Australia, she was ennobled at the request of Prime Minister Tony Blair and appointed the first female head of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council (formally the very honorable Lords Spiritual temporal and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled), the highest court (Senate) of Great Britain.
        
This is a revolution in Britain because she is the first black woman to head a body exclusively for white men since its inception in the fourteenth century. In addition the majority of seats were hereditary until 1999.
        
March 12, 2003, she became the first black woman to serve on the British government as Secretary of State for International Development. In July 2010, she was appointed Under-Secretary for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator by the Secretary General United Nations, Ban Ki-moon

Susana Baca de la Colina Esther, a diva, first black  Minister of Peru.

        
The daughter of a guitarist and a dancer, born May 24, 1944 in the district of Chorrillos in Lima. She is a singer and songwriter, and especially Black African origin.
         She is married to sociologist and musicologist Ricardo Pereira, collector of music and Afro-Peruvian songs and founder of the Institute Negrocontinuo in 1992.
         After graduating as a teacher, she became a singer and gets a Latin Grammy Award in 2002 for his album "Lamento Negro".
          On July 28, 2011, she was appointed Minister of Culture by President Ollanta Moises Humala Tasso, in office since July 28, 2011.
        
"I think I'm the first black minister in the history of Peru. In politics, we Afro-Peruvian we participate. " She told to the french newspaper" Le Monde "August 28, 2011.
        
She embodies the hopes of the marginalized a black community (10% of 28 million inhabitants of Peru) from the existence of the Republic of Peru in 1827.
         The First Blacks of African descent arrived in Peru in the company of Spanish Conquistadors in 1531.
        
Another feature Afro-Peruvian artist Eva Ayllón has welcomed the appointment: "I am happy for my black will be perfect, it is instead suitable. And it does not surprise us in any way, it's something we deserve, we had an artist has this place. It had to happen for a long time and I'm glad it's Susana, for who better than she knows what we deserve and what we need. "
        
Susana Baca has received praise from international artists such Tego Calderón, Puerto Rican and Brazilian Gilberto Passos Gil Moreira, who was also Minister of Culture in the government of President Lula Inacio Lula da Silva from 2003 to 2008 and it will seek advice.
        
On November 28, 2009, Peru was the first Latin American to have formally apologized to its citizens of African descent for centuries of discrimination.
        
The entrance to the Government of Susana Baca is the crowning of 2011 designated by the United Nations International Year of African descent.





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