vendredi 9 décembre 2011

Belgium: Arcadia Claret-Meyer, mistress of H.M. Leopold I.

 "When he meets the Claret Viescourt Arcadia in 1844, Leopold I (1790-1865) was the father of three young children and, in addition, the health of his second wife, Queen Louise-Marie, is faltering. Add to this the fact that under the legislation of the time, elected royal heart is still a minor age: he was only 18 when the relationship began when the King was already widely over fifty. Therefore, the father of Arcadia, a lieutenant-colonel of the Belgian Army, was not conducive to this idyll "says Victor Capron.
        
For convenience, he is officially married for the royal stables, Frederick Meyer (1808-1864) who permanently erased after the ceremony, except to sign official documents from time to time.
        
The beautiful Arcadia is housed in a mansion at No. 47 rue Royale with his servants, his car and livery.
        
In 1850, she was offered the Eppinghoven area, 123 hectares, including a former convent, farms and land, Holzheim Germany.
The following year, she received the Stuyvenberg castle in Laeken, bought by Leopold II (1835-1909) in 1889 and serves as the official residence of Prince Philippe and Princess Mathilde.
        
Leopold I hope that the first two are ennobled illegitimate son, but the Belgian government is opposed, then it is happy for his son and the mother of the title Coburg.
        
In 1863, Ms. Claret Arcady Meyer and his son are created "baronins von Eppinghoven" in Gotha.
        
To avoid scandal around this connection, the Belgian king distributes the "hush money (money paid to keep quiet)" to newspapers, says the historian Jean Stengers (Vertigo of the historian, the stories at the risk of chance, Brussels, 1998).
        
From this union were born two children prohibited the King wanted to keep out the need to leave them, via a secret fund and numerous real estate investments, part of his huge private fortune.
        
After over 150 years, there remains nothing more financial wealth was squandered by George (1849-1904) and Arthur Meyer von Eppinghoven (1852-1940), the illegitimate son of Leopold 1st.

10 commentaires:

  1. The King did not leave the sons of Arcadie Claret a huge fortune - whatever was left was squandered by her gold-digging and ambitious family. Arcadie's mother was no better than a certain royal's mother who pushed forward a daughter for financial gain. Truly reprehensible.

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  2. Also, it wasn't he, but Arcadie and her family who pushed for royal titles for her illegitimate children. Her sons turned out to be as dissolute and greedy as their brash, manipulative mother. It was never proven that these sons belonged to the King, as their mother was promiscuous.

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    Réponses
    1. He actually married her, the Catholic Church annulled the marriage:

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    2. Actually, that is not the least bit factual or true. I would suggest to maybe check your sources - certain people are not reliable and like to manufacture information about this woman. There is no way that Leopold would even contemplate marrying this woman- she had long stopped being a favourite yet always sought to enrich herself and her family. No source or proof he ever married her, sorry. Nobody seemed to like or respect her - certainly nobody in Brussels. File this under one of those items of fake news that gets handed around and should be dismissed.

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    3. There is a marriage licence. The family members have it...so it is not fake news.

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    4. Lucien Philippe Marie Antoine ( 1906–1984), Duke of Tervuren was one of the two sons of Leopold the 2nd, his parents were legally married, but having no catholic ceremony the Church did not recognize it, as it did not recognize the Marriage of his father in a civil ceremony. Being that I am a direct descendant of the family,and a legal one via a church ceremony, and access to people that knew...I know that these were legal marriages...they loved these women, and their children were given titles.

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  3. Jean Stengers and a few other obscure authors draw the wrong conclusions about this gold digger. She was never as important or worthy as they make her out to be. Just a suggestion -write about worthwhile women, not self-serving people who used others to enrich themselves.

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  4. Also, Victor Capron is not a valid source, either. Claret and her mother ensured that she was in royal favour so she had her daughter married to Meyer. It was good that later on the King saw the error of his ways though and dismissed her - but of course her family hung around for the favours they were very used to. A truly reprehensible family.

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  5. Very interesting. From my studies, this all seems quite true. I don't quite believe the wikipedia entry about this woman, seems very simple and quite fabricated. Some of the sources are fiction books and some of the sources cannot be authenticated! It seems like the author is crafting a narrative to validate his research about a very unworthy woman. For anybody who has met some members of the extended family, it would be fair to say the journal or diary entries mentioned are quite fabricated and changed. I don't know whom to blame here, as documents or letters can be easily change with entries, change of dates or in other ways. It seems like there is so little information about this woman that things may have been changed and/or purely made up. Everything seems very unsourced and suspicious - maybe it's because there is very little real information about her? There are true historians and authors who have pointed out that this woman was dismissed early on and was certainly not a "mistress" for 20 years, not even close to that many! Where are the links to their information that could set things straight? It may be a case of making things up in order to feel some sort of importance. It's a shame that certain modern authors just continue the fabrications based on this unsourced material.

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  6. Diane, this is about the dismissed and discarded gold-digger Arcadie Claret, who was only a favourite of Leopold I until even he got disgusted with her. This is not about the prostitute who lived off the Congo Blood money and supposedly had two bastards by Leopold II (possibly by her own pimp, whom she married later) Get the names right.

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